wilwheaton

lizwuzthere:

feigenbaumsworld:

image

Last Wednesday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced a proposal for new rules that would allow for a “ fast lane” of Internet traffic for content providers who are willing (and able) to pay a fee. [1] The proposal reverses the FCC’s previous commitment to net neutrality and open internet and allows ISP’s like Comcast or Verizon to slow down and censor services that don’t pay the toll.

We have to be totally honest, this situation is seriously grim. But there is still hope. The FCC already knows that the Internet community wants net neutrality, but they think they can put their spin on these new rules and sneak them through. If we can prove them wrong right now with a massive public outcry, we can literally save the Internet once again.

We need to stop the FCC now. Big business groups are already ramping up lobbying efforts with the FCC in swarms since Wednesday’s announcement in support of censoring the open Internet and to ensure this dangerous proposal moves forward. [2]

This is a critical moment. In the last few weeks more than 65,000 people have taken action with us. Can you help us get to 80,000 by the end of the day today?

[1] Gautham Nagesh. “FCC to Propose New ‘Net Neutrality’ Rules”.
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304518704579519963416350296

[2] Edward Wyatt. Edward Wyatt. “Lobbying Efforts Intensify After F.C.C. Tries 3rd Time on Net Neutrality” http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/25/business/lobbying-efforts-intensify-after-fcc-tries-3rd-time-on-net-neutrality.html?hpw&rref=politics

 

Here’s some extra (also important) information:

The chairman of the FCC, Tom Wheeler, was previously a lobbyist for the cable and wireless industry. This revolving door our government has with large corporations and their lobbyists is what leads to these kind of policy disasters which crush the competition of big businesses and devastate our individual freedoms.
Net Neutrality is important. Very VERY important.
But it’s just going to keep coming under fire again and again unless we address the underlying problem and that is the corrupting influence of money in our politics. 28th Amendment, anyone?

Having said that SIGN THE PETITION. We gotta do what we can at the moment.

wilwheaton

mouthbeef:

Here’s a reading (MP3) of a my latest Guardian column, Internet service providers charging for premium access hold us all to ransom, which tries to make sense of the disastrous news that the Federal Communications Commission is contemplating rules to allow ISPs to demand bribes from publishers in exchange for letting you see the webpages you ask for.

There’s a useful analogy to the phone company that I’ve written about here before: you pay for your phone service every month. The pizza place on the corner also pays for its phone service every month. When you want to order a pizza from Joe’s Corner Pizzeria, you call their number. If their phone isn’t engaged, it rings and you get to place your order. If they get more orders than they can handle on one line, they buy a second line, a third, even 10 lines to take their orders. Provided one of those lines is free, your call goes through to someone when you ring.

But what if your phone company decided that the way to bring in higher profits was to go around to all the pizza places and shake them down for “premium” access to “their” customers? If Joe’s Corner Pizzeria turned them down, your call to Joe’s might get a busy signal, even if there were plenty of free lines at Joe’s place. Meanwhile, an order to the monied, tasteless sultan of global cardboard pizza-ite, that is, the company who has plenty of money for “premium” access – is easy to reach, because your phone company has promised them that every call will be put through.

The thing is, Joe’s is paying for its lines. You’re paying for your line. The phone company exists solely to connect people to the numbers they dial. But because there are “natural monopolies” in phone service (because there are only so many mobile frequencies and underground cable space), they can abuse their position to extort additional payments from the services you want to talk to. And the more popular a service is, the better it is, the more the ISP stands to profit from this racket.

Mastering by John Taylor Williams: wryneckstudio@gmail.com

John Taylor Williams is a audiovisual and multimedia producer based in Washington, DC and the co-host of the Living Proof Brew Cast. Hear him wax poetic over a pint or two of beer by visiting livingproofbrewcast.com. In his free time he makes “Beer Jewelry” and “Odd Musical Furniture.” He often “meditates while reading cookbooks.”

MP3

theblogofmystery
artist3363:

beckie0:

simfected:

maythedownforcebewithyou:

myurlistoolong:

thefrogman:

A news station was interviewing a man who lived near a dangerous intersection. It is known for an inordinate number of car crashes.

HE JUST KIND OF STEPS BACK
“oh see there you go son”

BALLS OF NONCHALANT STEEL

“See, now this is the kinda shit I’m talking about…”

Woah.

He didn’t even drop his cigarette this literally didn’t surprise him at all omfg

artist3363:

beckie0:

simfected:

maythedownforcebewithyou:

myurlistoolong:

thefrogman:

A news station was interviewing a man who lived near a dangerous intersection. It is known for an inordinate number of car crashes.

HE JUST KIND OF STEPS BACK

“oh see there you go son”

BALLS OF NONCHALANT STEEL

“See, now this is the kinda shit I’m talking about…”

Woah.

He didn’t even drop his cigarette this literally didn’t surprise him at all omfg